THE EFFECT OF NOMADIC EDUCATION ON THE FULBE TRIBE A CASE STUDY

THE EFFECT OF NOMADIC EDUCATION ON THE FULBE TRIBE A CASE STUDY

 


                       
                  

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background of the study                                            1

1.2 Statement of the problems                                                 5

1.3 Objective of study                                                      5

1.4 Significance of the study                                            6

1.5 Research Questions                                                   6

1.6 Scope and delimitation of the study                          7

 

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1 Introduction                                                              8

2.2 Concept of nomadic Education                                  8

2.3 Importance of nomadic education                             10

2.4 Problems of nomadic education                                 11

2.5 Solution to the problems                                           13

2.6 Nomadic education in Nigeria                                    15

2.7 Nomadic education in Sokoto State                           17

Summary                                                                         19

  CHAPTER THREE: METHODOLOGY

3. Introduction                                                                        20

3.2 Research design                                                         20

3.3 Population of the study                                      20

3.4 Sample and sampling technique                                21

3.5 Instrumentation                                                        22

3.6 Validity of the instrument                                  22

3.7 Reliability of the instrument                              22

3.8 Method of data analysis                                     22

 CHAPTER FOUR:DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

4.1 Introduction                                                              23

 4.2 Analysis of teachers and administrators Questionnaire 23

4.3 Analysis of parents Questionnaire                             23

  CHAPTER FIVE

5.1 Introduction                                                      45

5.2 Summary of major findings                                       45

5.3 Conclusion                                                        46

5.4 Recommendation                                                47

       References                                                                49

Appendix I Teachers and administrators Questionnaire 51

Appendix II Parents Questionnaire

 

INTRODUCTION

1.2   STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

The implementation of an educational programmed for the nomadic people of Nigeria is a deliberate effort of the federal government. The whole support however given to the programmed is bared out of government conviction that education is the right of every Nigeria child, irrespective of his/her sex and socio-economic circumstances. The modest success recorded by the agency as well as the gigantic enthusiasm shown by the beneficiaries in the state. The main problem is, there is no significance change in the life of fulbe tribe in Yabo local government area. Despite twenty years of its operation.

1.3      OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY.

Sokoto state agency for nomadic education is making efforts to exploit all avenues to salvage the system in state at large. This is done through mobilization which have sensational of the holders which have possible impact to the program in general.

Consequently upon the above the study is directed towards achieving the following :-

v To find the effect of nomadic education on fulbe tribe

v To identify the problems being faced by the programmed.

v To find the solution to the problems.

The research will show how nomadic education affected or otherwise the life of the nomadic also the study will find the possible solution of the problem faced towards the programmed in the area and state in general the research will find the weakness and lapses of the programmed in other to give some suggestion agencies concern.

1.4      SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY

The researches carry out under the following:-

v What is to effect of nomadic education?

v What are the solutions to the problems of nomadic education?

 

 

 

 

1.5      SCOPE AND DELIMITATION OF THE STUDY

        This research work will be restricted to Yabo local government nomadic education programmed its respondents will be from members of the community involving, parents, teachers, and school administrations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER TWO

2.1   INTRODUCTION

This chapter discusses about the concept of nomadic education in Nigeria, the importance of nomadic education was highlight, as well as problems, that faced nomadic education in Nigeria and solution to the problems of nomadic education.

2.2   CONCEPT OF NOMADIC EDUCATION

Concepts of nomadic education have been of consistence fascination for social scientist, especially for the anthropologist since the early 1940s part of fascination is due to the fact that when mobility and livestock dependence coincide, complexities which are difficult to unravel are provided.

Early views on nomadic pastoral societies are stereo type to the extent that they are looked upon and regarded as brave, independent, fiercemen, freely moving with their herds, and not having to deal with the constraints and frustration of the settled and civilized living.

Nomadic pastoralist has been treated (in its pure form) as the negation of agriculture; as having classic and specialized herders, entirely devoted to the care of domesticated animals. And in the process they move dramatic – distance.

Education for the nomads is a country wide project aimed at giving opportunities for education to the Nigerian nomads, in the same way as the settled communities are enjoying obviously this will attract the attention and interest of groups of professional and the general public in the society.

The nomad has the same and equal right of access to education, at all levels, like other Nigerians, as provided in our constitution, (1989). To deny him this right, by putting these obstacles in his way, is a violation of that constitution.

During the late sixties and early seventies, when the country was passing through the effects of the civil war, under the first military rule, some of the six northern state were making attempt to work out possible ways for the implementation of the provision that law, e.g. a memorandum prepared by a commissioner of agriculture and natural resources in the defunct north-eastern state, Alhaji Muhammad mai, title “ the settlement and education of nomadic fulbe “ (1972).

 

2.3      IMPORTANCE OF NOMADIC EDUCATION

Nomadic education programmed is basically a primary and adult education in conformity with the universal basic education scheme (UBE) designed to improve the productivity of nomads, promote social justice and equity and sensitize them to their basic human and constitutional right as bonified Nigerians. The nomads maintain a peculiar position within the mainstream of the Nigerian society.

Nomadic Education is not a new phenomenon in the Nigerian educational scene since records have it that a nomadic school was established in Karkarku village in Daura local government of Katsina State as far back as 1967. What is new is its incorporation in to the nation’s education system. The institutionalization of nomadic education has made it now unusual, multi-dimensional and highly passive social programmed, beyond just the ordinary consideration of new educational sector (AMINU 1989)because of its implications for economic and social well-being of the nomads.

The factors governing the implementation of the nomadic education programme centers on the full knowledge of what the task involves, its enormity, the evolution of proven strategies for its implementation, i.e. good planning the availability of the packages of resources required for the execution of the programmed, i.e. careful coating and affirmation of availability of the funds for execution, the political will and commitment to see the programme to a successful take-off and solid financial base for its perpetuity.

2.4      PROBLEMS OF NOMADIC EDUCATION

The federal government, and indeed several state governments, of the federation including the federal capital territory Abuja boldly introduced the nomadic education programme into the formal educational system and attempted to institutionalized it. This met with some measure of skepticism, rebuff and resistance by some categories of nomads and some sectors of the country’s population.

The public apathy focused on the inappropriateness of providing special educational condition and environment for the nomads on the ground that there are no laws prohibiting them from participating in the mainstream education programme. If they, the nomads wants education they would go for it. They should therefore not be forced to either send their children to school or be forced into adult education programme. So nomads on the other hand saw the programmed as a tool for westernizing their life cycle, culture, tradition, social norms, and in particular their religions. Other schools of thought had it that the nomads as wanderers could never be educated and if per-chance that happened they would cease to be nomads and the nation would loose its sources of protein supply which came from the cattle reared by them.

Besides the negative attitude to the programme as explained above, there were other issues that constituted constrains to the effective and take-off of the nomad education programme these are:

The absence of adequate physical facilities, trained manpower, appropriate instructional material, and ill-defined classroom structure as well as the lack of resources revealed lack of forward planning and adequate preparation.

   The peripheral status accorded to the programme, by the federal and state government resulting in low priority rating and inadequate allocation of resources in terms of money, In the national plan.

The poor financial resources base worsened by the prevailing economic situation of the country as well as the existence of myriads of competing needs for the available scares resources, further compounded the problems.

2.5   SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS

Undauntedly, the nation wide awareness campaign to promote nomadic education engineered by the federal ministry of education within the past years had been very fruitful. The first step towards the rectification of the depravation of the cattle rearers in terms of education and social amenities is sympathetic understanding of the nomadic way of life and problem of nomadic.

   Mobile education has been tried out successfully in many countries of Africa apart from the mobile schools the blue-print (1987) recommends a multifaceted approach consisting of the primary school boarding that exists in Algeria libya, Kenya e.t.c

Education for itinerant people is not an exclusive Nigeria phenomena, educational settlement scheme abound in all the continents.

The blueprint (1987) on nomadic education created a facal position for a body that was expected to tackles the issue of grazing reserves settlement areas cattle markets, clinies and setting up of schools at the federal state and local government levels.

In order to maintain the laudable pace at which the nomadic education programmed is being pursued, the federal government approved the up, of advisory committee was fully operational.

The nomadic education was a new multi-dimensional and highly pervasive, social programmed beyond just the ordinary consideration of an educational sub-sector.

The state nomadic education committee functions both as the agent of the state government as well as that of the federal government. As an agent of the state government it develops state NPE policies, evolves strategies for their effective implementation, monitors, and evaluates the programmed and maintain up-to-date information and statistical data on the state NPE.

NOMADIC EDUCATION IN NIGERIA

The nomadic education programmed in Nigeria started officially in November 1986, after the yola national workshop resolve that, “the nomads needed a fair deal through the provision of education and other social amenities to reciprocate their contribution to national building”. The national commission for nomadic education (N.C.N.E) began functioning in January 1990 with 206 schools 1,500 students and 499 teachers. Ninety seven.... of the school had permanent buildings. The rest of the school operated in temporary structures or under the trees. Some schools had furniture’s others used mats. The schools taught a modified curriculum in English, arithmetic, social studies, and primary science, developed by the usmanu Danfodio University, sokoto.

To adapt to the work rhythms, nomadic schools run morning and afternoon shifts, and children rotate between herding and schooling.

By January, the N.C.N.E had spent 72, 930 naira to produce textbook in the four curricula areas. The first prototype of a collapsible mobile classroom manufactured by the federal science equipment manufacturing center, Enugu was tested on April 23, 1991 (ISMA’ILA 2002). The nomadic education programmed had a multifaceted schooling arrangement to suit the diverse trans human habits of the fulani’s. different agencies are involved in educational process. These agencies include the ministry of education, schools management board, the N.C.N.E, the agencies for mass literacy, and the scholarship board. They work together to offer a mobile school system where the schools and the teachers move with the Fulani children. Nomadic education in Nigeria is effected by defective policy, inadequate finance, and fautry school placement, incessant migration of students, unreliable obsolete data, and cultural and religious textbooks.

While some of these problems are solved by policy and infrastructure interventions, most of the problems are complex and difficult to solve. The persistence of these problems is causing the roaming Fulani to remain educationally background (Isma;ila 2002).

According to Nafisatu (2002) Nigeria has two broad categories of nomads Nomadic pastoralists, whose population is estimated to be 6.5 million and artisanal migrant fishermen, whose population is estimated to be 2.8 million people. The pastoral category is made up of the Fulani (5.3 million), the koyan (32,000), the badawi (20,000) and dark. Bazzu (15,000).        The largest pastoralism group of the nomads, the Fulani are found in 31 out of 36 states of the federation, while the rest of the pastoralist is mainly found in the Borno plain and these shores of lake chad.

2.5      NOMADIC EDUCATION IN SOKOTO STATE:         

The nomadic education programmed started in November 1986, after the Yola national workshop on nomadic education.

In December 1989, the federal government established the national commission for nomadic education (N.C.N.E) by decree NO 41. the nomadic N.C.N.E is charge with the responsibility of implementation the nomadic education programmed the broad goals of the programmed are:

v To provide the nomads with relevant and functional basic education.

v To improve the survival skills of the nomads by providing them with knowledge and skills that will enable them raise their productivity and levels of income.

v Also, participate effectively in the nation socio-economic and political affairs.

Its against this background that the state agency for nomadic education was established by the sokoto state government under the state ministry of education, which appointed a coordinators. The sokoto state government started the implementation of nomadic education since 1989, when the y said unit stated above was created within the responsibilities of implementing policy guidelines from the national level as it effects the programmed in the state. Since the programmed is growing from strength to strenthed in the state.

2.6      SUMMARY

To summarized, the chapter has advocated that the major aim and objectives of the NPE is to improve the well-being of the nomads through the provision of opportunity for formal education.

   There are conditions to be satisfied before the NPE can take-off successfully in the country and this therefore implies the needs to establish a conducive atmosphere. The concept of nomadic education is much more than the provision of education for a specific group of people within the Nigerian society. It also involves the establishment of welfare services; the ultimate objectives of which is to have the nomads live a settled life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER THREE

METHODOLOGY

3.1   INTRODUCTION

This chapter deal with methodology of the research and has the following sub heading research design population of the study sample and sampling techniques, instrument for data collection, validity, reliability and method of data analysis.

3.2   RESEARCH DESIGN

The research uses descriptive research design. In order to study the present situation of nomadic education in the study area. Survey method was used.

3.3   POPULATION OF THE STUDY

The population of this study in essence is nomadic school. n this respect three main groups will be considered as the population of the study which include parents, teachers, as well as school administrators, particularly with references to yabo local government area.

3.4   SAMPLING AND SAMPLING TECHNIQUES

50 people will be used as a sample of this study, the sample used for collection or gathering information were parent, teachers, school administrators since the population of the study were restricted to three groups of people, so that the researchers have adopted the simple random. Sampling technique to get the sample from each group.

In this regard ten (20) questionnaires were administered to the parents, while another twenty (20) questionnaire were used for the school administrators also twenty (10) questionnaire were used or administered to the teachers respectively by doing that fifty (50) questionnaires were administered for the whole groups.

3.5   INSTRUMENTATION

Questionnaires were used to collect data or information. Therefore a sets of question were used or applied to the target groups.            

3.6   VALIDITY OF THE ANALYSIS

The validity of the questionnaire was established. The instruments were given to experts in the test and measurement in the department of education, Shehu Shagari college of education sokoto who established its content validity.

 

 

3.7   RELIABILITY OF THE INSTRUMENT

The reliability of instrument was established by using test-retest method. The instrument was administered and re-administered after two weeks to the selected sample population and result of the two tests showed or confirmed the reliability of the instrument.

3.8   METHOD OF DATA INSTRUMENT

The method used for analyzing the data collected is simple frequencies table and percentage this was considered adequate and appropriate for the purpose of this research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER FOUR

DATA ANALYSIS AND PRESENTATION

4.1   INTRODUCTION:

The chapter deals with data presentation and analysis, according to the (40) questionnaire distributed to the respondents. And data that collected will be analyzed and discuss by use of frequency table and simple percentage.

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR NOMADIC TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS:

4.1   Question one: what is your qualification?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

SSCE

13

32.5%

GRADE II

15

37.5%

JIS

4

10%

HIS

5

12.5%

NCE

3

7.5%

GRADUATE

0

0%

TOTAL

40

100%

From the above table it shows that 13 respondent representing 32.5% have SSCE qualification, 15 respondent representing 37.5% have GRADE II qualification, while 4 respondents representing 10% have JIS certificate, 5 respondent representing 7.5% have NCE qualification, finally 0 respondent 0% shows that there is no graduate qualification. This table shows us that there is in adequate minimum qualification for teaching in the area.

4.2 Question two: How many teacher do you have in your   school

         Name OF SCHOOL

RESPONSES

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

RIJIYAR DANO NOMADIC PRI.SCHOOL

18

15

37.5%

BASIMA NOMADIC PRI.SCHOOL

12

14

3.5%

GIDAN GANBU NOMADIC PRI.SCHOOL

10

11

27.5%

 

TOTAL

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 15 respondent representing 37.5% from Rijiyar dana said, they have 18 teachers in their school while 14 respondent representing 35%from basima nomadic primary school said they have 12 teachers and 11 respondent representing 27.5% from gidan gambu nomadic primary school, said they have 10 teachers, this give the total of 40 teachers were found in the area.

4.3 Question three: Are the teachers qualified?  

   RESPONSES

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

YES

35

87.5%

NO

5

12.5%

TOTAL

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 35 respondent representing 87.5% said that, the teachers are qualified, while 5 respondent representing 12.5% said that they are not qualified.

4.4 question four: What type of structure do you have in your    school?

RESPONCES

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Permanent

5

12.5%

Temporary

8

20%

Mobile

27

67.5%

Others

0

0%

Total

40

100%

 

From the table above it shows that 5 respondent representing 12.5% said they have permanent site or structure, while 8 respondent representing 20% said that they have temporary structure, then 27 respondents representing 67.5% said that, they have mobile structure and 0 respondent representing 0%. This data shows that, there is inadequate structure in the area.

4.5 Question five: Do you have instructional material in your     school?

RESPONCES

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

YES

26

65%

NO

14

35%

TOTAL

4O

100%

 

The table above it shows that 26 respondent representing 65% said that there are enough instructional material in their schools, while 14 respondent representing 35% said that there are no instructional materials in their schools.

4.6 question six: Who established the nomadic school?

RESPONCES

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Federal

5

12.5%

State

25

62.5%

Local government

10

25%

Community

0

0%

Total

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 5 response representing 12.5% said that is the federal government that established the nomadic school, while 25 response representing 62.5% said nomadic school was established by the state government, then, 10 response representing 25% said that the nomadic school was established by the local government authority, finally 0% response representing community which shows that community have done nothing in the establishment of nomadic schools.

4.7 Question seven: Does the students show their interest in     your teaching?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

36

90%

No

4

10%

Total

40

100%

  

From the above table shows that 36 response representing 90% said that the students are interested in his teaching, while 4 response representing 10% said that have no interest in his teaching, this shows that majority of the students have interest in his teaching.

4.8 Question eight: What subject do you teach?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

English

16

40%

Social studies

8

20%

Arabic

5

12.5%

Math

10

25%

Fulfulde

01

2.5%

Total

40

100%

 

From the above table shows that 16 response representing 40% teaches English, while 8 response representing 20% teaches social studies and 5 response representing 12.5% teaches Arabic, while 10 response representing 25% teaches math and 1 response representing 2.5% teaches Fulfulde, this data shows that there is teachers whose teaches western education to the nomadic school.

4.9 Question nine: What type of method do you use?

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERECNTAGE

LECTURE METHOD

2

5%

DEMOSTRATION METHOD

36

90%

DISCUSSION METHOD

2

5%

TOTAL

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 2 response representing 5% are using lecture method, while 36 response representing 90% are using demonstration method, And 2 response representing 5% are using discussion method. From the data collection shows that neither lecture method nor discussion method is appropriate method in teaching nomadic school but the most accepted in teaching nomadic school was demonstration method.

4.10 Question ten: How often the supervisor visit your school?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Weekly

10

25%

Monthly

25

62.5%

Yearly

5

12.5%

None of the above

0

0%

Total

40

100%

 

The above table it shows that 10 response representing 25% said that are supervisor weekly, while 25 response representing 62.5% said that are supervisor monthly, then 5 response representing 12.5% said that hay are supervised yearly. Finally 0% representing none of the above. This shows that the nomadic schools is being supervised in the area.

4.11 Question eleven: How conducive the environment?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Conducive

34

87.5%

Un-conducive

6

15%

Total

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 34 response representing 87.5% said that the environment is adequately conducive, while the 6 response representing 15% said that the environment was un-conducive.

         

4.12 Question twelve: Does the government give necessary         support to the programmed?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

31

77.5%

No

9

22.5%

Total

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 31 response representing 77.5% said that yes, while 9 response representing 22.5% said that no, this data shows that the government is given necessary support to the programmed.

4.13 Question thirteen: In what ways does the system affect      the life of fulbe people?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

To enable them to know their right

15

37.5%

It will made them to know how to read and write

20

50%

To become a good member to the society

5

12.5%

Total

40

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 15 response representing 37.5% said that the system will enable the fulbe to know their right and 20 response representing 50% said that the system it will made the fulbe people to read and write, while 5 response representing 12.5% said that the system also will enable the fulbe to become a good member to the society.

QUESTION FOURTEEN

4.14         What will you considered the solution to the problems the system is facing?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Provision of instructional material

7

17.5%

Through financial assistance government should be given to the teachers.

4

10%

Conducive environment should be built

6

15%

To train a qualified teacher

9

22.5%

Community assistance

8

20%

Through the assistance of private organization

6

15%

Total

40

100%

 

From the table it shows that 7 response representing 17.5% said that the only solution to the problems, is provision of instructional materials, while 4 response representing 10% said that the problem can be solve if government incentive is given to the teacher, and 6 response representing 15% conducive environment should be provided, while 9 response representing 22.5% said a trained qualified teacher.

ANALYSIS OF PARENTS QUESTIONNAIRE

Ten (10) questionnaire were distributed or issued and returned as its issued.

4.15 Question one1: do you have enough nomadic schools in your area?

        Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

7

70%

No

3

30%

Total

10

100%

 

From the above table it shows that 7 response representing 70% were of the view of they have enough nomadic schools in their area, while three (3) response representing 30% were of the view that they don’t have enough nomadic schools in their area.

QUESTION 2:

4.16         Are your children attending school?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

9

90%

No

1

10%

Total

10

100%

 

 The above table it shows that 9 respondent representing 90% said that their children are regular attendance, while 1 respondent representing 10% were said no full participation in the school.

QUESTION 3:  

    4.17 Does the government give full support to the programmed?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

9

90%

No

1

10%

Total

10

100%

 

The above table shows that 9 respondent representing 90% stated that the government gave necessary support to the programmed extensively, while 1 respondent 10 % where said that there is no support by the government towards the programmed.

QUESTION 4:

4.18 Which school do you prepare children to attend?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Non nomadic

0

0%

Nomadic

6

60%

Qur’anic 

4

40%

All of the above

0

0

Total

10

100%

 

From the table above it shows that zero 0 respondent representing 0% shows, no interest in non-nomadic school, while 6 respondent representing 60% shows interest in sending their children to nomadic schools, also, 4 respondent representing 40% said, they prepared to send their children to Qur’anic schools, then 0 respondent representing 0%.

 

 

QUESTION 5:

4.19         What kind of assistance do you provide to the school?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Financial assistance

1

10%

Teaching aids

0

0%

Structure

9

90%

All of the above

0

0%

Total

10

100%

 

The above table it said that one 1 respondent representing 10% he is given financial assistance to the school, while 0 response representing 0% shows no body has provide by 9 response representing 90% were provide structure to the school, while zero 0 response representing 0% with nothing.


QUESTION 6:

4.20 Are your people sensitized?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Yes

7

70%

No 

3

30%

Total

10 

100%

 

The above table it shows that 7 response representing 70% said yes their people are extensively sensitized, while 3 response representing 30% said no there is any sensitization about thje programmed.

QUESTION 7:

4.21 What benefit do you think could derived as a result of this education;

RESPONSE

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Knowledge

4

40%

Skills

5

50%

Moral conduct

1

10%

None of the above

10

10%

Total

10

100%

 

From the above table it show that 4 response representing 40% said they will acquired knowledge, while 5 response representing 50% said that skills will be derived, where 1 response representing 10% said he will have a moral conduct as a result of education, then 0 response representing 0% with nothing.

QUESTION 8:

4.22         What do you like your child to become?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

A teacher

6

60%

A doctor

2

20%

A government

2

20%

Total

10

100%

 

From the above table it shows 6 response representing 60% like their children to become a teachers, while 2 response representing 20% were like their children to become a doctor, then 2 response representing 20% said they like children to become a governor.

   

QUESTION 9:

4.23 How can the education affect your life style?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

To know my right

1

10%

To promote standard of living

2

20%

To promote my socio-economic

6

60%

To live in a healthy environment

1

10%

Total

10

100%

 

The table above show that 1 response representing 10% education will affect his life style by knowing his right, while 2 response representing 20% said the education will change their life style by promoting their standard of living, and 6 response representing 60% have the view that education will affect their life style through promotion of their socio-economic background, finally 1 response representing 10% said education will affect his life style by enable him to live a good healthy environment. This means that, they would have positive change in life style as a result of education.

QUESTION 10:

4.24 What problems is the system facing?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Lack of instructional material

4

40%

Inadequate finance

3

30%

In adequate structure

3

30%

Total

10

100%

 

 

 

 

The above table it shows that 4 response representing 40% stated that instructional material is one of the problem facing the system, while 3 response representing 30% point out inadequate finance is one of the major menace facing the system, finally 3 response representing 30% stated that, inadequate structure is also a constrains facing the system in the area.

QUESTION 11:

4.25         How can these problems be solved?

Response

Frequency

Percentage

Through provision of adequate instructional material

5

50%

Adequate finance supply to the system

3

30%

More structure should be built

2

20%

Total

10

100%

 

From the table above it shows, 5 response  representing 50% said the problems can be rectified through provision of adequate instructional material, while 3 response representing 30% have the view that this problems can be solve if adequate financing was intensified, finally 2 response representing 20% said more structure should be built if the system is to progressed.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER FIVE

SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION:

5.1 INTRODUCTION :

        This chapter discusses and summary of major findings, conclusion and recommendations

5.2 SUMMARY :

The major findings in this research project are, there are enough  teacher in the nomadic  schools in the area and also are qualified .The nomadic education in Yabo local government  area were affected the life style of fulbe tribe in which the programme enable them to read and write as well as to speak fluently.

    Moreover , the programme were given huge support both, by federal government, staea government as well as local government authority during its implementation. Also the programme of nomadic education in Yabo local government area, has promoted the socio-economic of fulbe tribe in the area. Yabo local government area has enough nomadic schools  such as Rijiyar Dano nomadic primary schools, Basima nomadic primary schools, Gidan Gambu  nomadic primary schools, among others.

    The programme produced a good skilled fulbe and other nomadic people in Yabo local government area, also the children of nomads people shows interest in attending the nomadic schools regularly.

5.3 CONCLUSION

    In conclusion the major findings in this research project were teachers are sufficiently enough in the nomadic schools. But there is need for the provision of adequate instructional materials as well as provision of permanent structure to the nomadic children in Yabo local government area. According to findings shows federal government with collaboration  of the state government were established the nomadic education in Yabo local government area.

     “fulbe tribe” social groups and nomadic children who are in primary schools today and those are yet to enroll, who are expected to be leaders of tomorrow need to be given necessary attention in educating them in the area of western education in the future to come. This can made them to become social and full aware of their rights like other citizen. This can reduce the levels of marginalization they are experiencing in the area of education. Also the government gave its full support for the amelioration of the programme in Yabo local government area through financing the system in the area and state in general.

5.4      RECOMMENDATION :

To improve the nomadic education program in Yabo local government area and state in general. Therefore, following recommendations need to be addressed. So, far the full success of nomadic education, the following sets of recommendations are crucial important.

The state government should introduce another low or edict  that will make it mandatory for the local governments in the state to fully finance the various nomadic education policies in their respective local government areas, as well as enabling them to over see the implementation of the program properly in order to perform the following functions effectively .

Liase with the state agency for nomadic education programs to ensure successful implementation of the programs in the area.

Build and manage nomadic education primary schools and nomadic adult literacy classes in Yabo local government area.

Government should provide or supply more instructional materials for proper learning, this will enhance the progress of the the program in the area the program in the area

      Also the state government through agency for nomadic education should give incentive to the dedicated teachers to attract more of them in order  to retain them in active services.

     Government should send more teachers for trainin and retraining so as to ensure better delivery of the programs, as it was observed that, majority of the teachers were holders of grade two teachers certificate, higher Islamic studies, e.t.c . only a few of them have able to go back to school to acquire Nigeria certificate in education N.C.E. this should be the authority concerned.

       

 

REFERENCES

Aminu, jibril [1986]. Fair Deal for the Nomads, key note         Address of         the first National work shop on the education of Nomadic      Education, yola.

Blue print on the education [1996]: Sokoto state ministry of   education, Sokoto.

 Nafisatu, M. [2002]; situation Report on nomadic education.

         Prepared by the department of programme development        and

Extension, National commission for Nomadic Education         Kaduna,   Nigeria.

 Ismail, I. [2002];problems of Nomadic Education and    Education for         nomadic Fulani, Washington, D.C. USA.

Ezeomah ,C.[1990];Educating nomads for self         actualization    and  development. International  Bureau of    Education,  Geneva.

Blue print [1987]on Nomadic Education, Lagos Government printers.

 Gidado Tahir [1991]Education and pastoralism in Nigeria.

Federal ministry of Education [1981].National policy on Education Lagos on Education Lagos.    


Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post